The Guthrie City Council met for the last time in 2019 on Tuesday night.  All the council members were present for a special workshop and regularly scheduled meeting.

The workshop took 35 minutes to go through the grant application for fixing the Harrison Street bridge, which needs to be demolished followed by repair of the road. The city is applying for two different transportation block grants to rehabilitate Oklahoma from Division to Broad Street and Harrison Avenue west of Wentz to Division to reconstruct the roads, water lines and address drainage issues in the area.

The Oklahoma Ave. project is $1.2 million, with the city having to absorb $333,313 of the cost. The Harrison St. project is proposed at $2.3 million with the city having to absorb $271,760 for the repairs. If the city would fix just the bridge and roadway on Harrison, the price tag would be right about $1 million. The grants will allow the city to get several projects done at the same time for less money, approximately $605,000.

City Manager Leroy Alsup in his presentation to the council advised the council if both Harrison and Oklahoma get approved the city may have to pay for the Wentz Street improvements in the plan. That cost would be approximately$459,172. So, the city could get some major infrastructure repaired for $2.7 million, with the city having to absorb about a third of it at one million dollars.

The entire downtown project on the board is $6.1 million, but the city currently does not have the funds for the rest of the project.

The council unanimously approved having city staff move forward with the grant application for the projects. The grants are very competitive and if Guthrie gets the grants, the repairs will not start before Spring, 2020. The workshop adjourned at 6:35 p.m.

The Guthrie Public Works Authority (GPWA) meeting was brief as the only agenda items were consent agenda items that passed on a 6-0 vote.

The council then went to work on the consent agenda which was approved 6-0. Ward One Councilman Jim Case was then elected Vice-Mayor for the remainder of the council term into May 2021. Tenny Maker then made a presentation to the council with an ordinance change on speed limits in the city. There were several changes adopted in the motion. Those changes include West Noble Avenue, west, from 1st Street to .10 miles west of 20th Street, a maximum of 35 miles per hour; West Noble Avenue, west, from .10 miles west of 20th Street to Academy Commerce, a maximum speed of 45 miles per hour; West Noble Avenue, west, from Academy Commerce to .50 miles to the west city limits line, a maximum speed of 55 miles per hour; South Division Street, north, from 1-35 to Pulse Prairie Grove Road, a maximum speed of 55 miles per hour; South Division Street, north, from Pulse Prairie Grove Road to Allen Road, a maximum speed of 45 miles per hour; and South Division Street, north, from Allen Road to Snake Creek Bridge a maximum speed of 35 miles per hour.

Ward III Councilman Don Channel expressed a concern on several other streets that were not in the agenda item. Maker indicated to the council he would get with the street committee and do some traffic surveys and bring it back to the council at a future date. The motion on the changes were approved unanimously.

The fire department then presented information about accepting a grant for $164,000 to be used towards the purchase of two new ambulances. The total purchase of the ambulances will cost approximately $465,000 but that was not on the agenda. Once the city gets the grant money, the ambulance purchase will be brought back to council for approval. The fire department also received approval to buy two Stryker PowerLOAD devices for the ambulances. Both items were approved on 6-0 votes.

The council then moved into executive session to finish out their evening to discuss pending litigation that has been filed against the city.

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